Schools Show Improvement

kids holding books

The New Mexico Public Education Department (PED) released their 2017 report cards for 89 public school districts and 71 charter schools, academies and other specialized institutes. The T-or-C Municipal District earned a B in the state’s A through F grading system. After five years of hovering at the mid-point of C-grade, the district is on the road to improvement.
While none of our schools across the district were rated in the top five percent statewide, none were listed as in Focus, Priority or Strategic status. These are the lowest performing schools, statuses reserved for the lowest 10 percent of those in the report.
In some of the specific key areas T-or-C Schools are performing above the state averages. Our graduation rate for the most recently documented year, 2016 is 82 per cent. While the educators, administrators and other staff of the district are committed to raising this number, it is well above the state average of 71 per cent. The district’s drop out rate for the same year, while higher than our schools are striving for, at 13 per cent, is significantly lower than the state average of 16 percent.
The report also looked at teacher qualifications. Though there were no state averages to compare against, of the teachers in the district, 38 percent have earned a university graduate degree, of Master’s or higher.

Local 2017 PARCC Results Released

kids holding books

The state of New Mexico’s Public Education Department (PED) released the results of its 2017 PARCC Testing (Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers). One of only five states, plus the District of Columbia, still using this controversial and widely discredited common core testing system, New Mexico seems unduly reluctant to follow the lead of at least 30 other states and drop these questionable tests.
In 2010, when PARCC testing was introduced, 13 states and the District of Columbia used it. Altogether 45 states used either this or the similar system, Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) testing. Together these two testing consortiums were the bodies awarded federal funding to develop and administer standardized testing that would ensure common standards in math and English education across the country. In just six years the number of states using either of them has dropped to 20. Of these, only five now use the PARCC testing system. Clearly there is a problem either real or perceived.